Archive for the 'Antiques' Category

The Piazza Venezia, Rome, Italy

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2008

The Piazza Venezia is a piazza in central Rome, It takes its name from the adjacent Palazzo Venezia.

The piazza is at the foot of the Capitoline Hill and near the Roman Forum. It is dominated by the imposing Victor Emmanuel II monument. This is the large central square in the hub of Rome.




Piazza Venezia has a constant stream of traffic, yet no traffic lights. Instead, a white gloved traffic police officer stands on a block and directs traffic.

[Source: Wikipedia]

Nan Madol, Micronesia

Tuesday, February 12th, 2008

Nan Madol is a ruined city that lies off the eastern shore of the island of Pohnpei (presently one of the four states in the Federated States of Micronesia) and used to be the capital of the Saudeleur dynasty until about AD 1500.[2] The city consists of a series of small artificial islands linked by a network of canals and is often called the Venice of the Pacific. The name Nan Madol means “spaces between” and is a reference to the canals that criss-cross the ruins.
Nan Madol was the ceremonial and political seat of the Saudeleur dynasty, which united Pohnpei’s estimated 25,000 people.[2] Set apart on the main island of Pohnpei, it was a scene of human activity as early as the first or second century AD. By the 8th or 9th century islet construction had started, but the distinctive megalithic architecture was probably not begun until perhaps the 12th or early 13th century.



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The cathedral of Reims (Notre-Dame de Reims), France

Sunday, July 15th, 2007

Notre-Dame de Reims (Our Lady of Rheims) is the cathedral of Reims, where the kings of France were once crowned. It replaces an older church, destroyed by a fire in 1211 and built itself on the site of the basilica, where Clovis was baptized by saint Remi, bishop of Reims, in AD 496. The cathedral was completed by the end of the 13th century, with the exception of the Western front. That portion was erected in the 14th century after 13th century designs—the nave having in the meantime been lengthened to afford room for the crowds that attended the coronations. The towers, 81 m tall (approx. 267 ft), were originally designed to rise 120 m (approx. 394 ft). The Southern tower holds two great bells; one of them, named “Charlotte” by the cardinal of Lorraine in 1570, weighs more than 10,000 kg (approx. 11 tons).



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