Archive for July, 2007

USS Lexington CV-16 aircraft carrier, Corpus Christi, Texas, USA

Saturday, July 28th, 2007

USS Lexington (CV/CVA/CVS/CVT-16), known as “The Blue Ghost”, was an Essex-class aircraft carrier, the fifth United States Naval ship named in honor of the Revolutionary War Battle of Lexington. Laid down as Cabot on 15 July 1941 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass., the ship was renamed Lexington 16 June 1942, after the loss of Lexington (CV-2) in the Battle of the Coral Sea. She was launched 23 September 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Theodore Douglas Robinson; and commissioned 17 February 1943, Captain Felix Budwell Stump, USN in command.



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The Russian Knights at Kubinka Air Base in Moscow, Russia

Saturday, July 28th, 2007

The Russian Knights at Kubinka Air Base in Moscow, Russia.
The Russian Knights (Russian: Русские Витязи) are an aerobatic demonstration team of the Russian Air Force. Originally formed on April 5, 1991 at the Kubinka Air Base as a team of six Sukhoi Su-27s, the team was the first to perform outside the Soviet Union in September 1991 when they toured the United Kingdom. On December 12, 1995, disaster struck as three team members flew into a mountainside while practicing formation flying in adverse weather. Despite this unprecedented tragedy, the team bounced back and now performs with four Su-27P’s and 2 Su-27UB’s and in 2005, the Russian Knights acquired five Su-35 Super Flankers, but due to financial problems, these are not used in the displays.



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The cathedral of Reims (Notre-Dame de Reims), France

Sunday, July 15th, 2007

Notre-Dame de Reims (Our Lady of Rheims) is the cathedral of Reims, where the kings of France were once crowned. It replaces an older church, destroyed by a fire in 1211 and built itself on the site of the basilica, where Clovis was baptized by saint Remi, bishop of Reims, in AD 496. The cathedral was completed by the end of the 13th century, with the exception of the Western front. That portion was erected in the 14th century after 13th century designs—the nave having in the meantime been lengthened to afford room for the crowds that attended the coronations. The towers, 81 m tall (approx. 267 ft), were originally designed to rise 120 m (approx. 394 ft). The Southern tower holds two great bells; one of them, named “Charlotte” by the cardinal of Lorraine in 1570, weighs more than 10,000 kg (approx. 11 tons).



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